Kevin...about your brakes

sbrookeinmd

Staff member
Contributing Member
#1
Per our discussion at the alignment...you said your calipers are Mark 7's from TrakAuto right? Did you go with stainless lines? And what rotors did you use on the front? Actually, where did anyone get new front rotors? Thanks!
 

kellerscobra

Contributing Member
Member
#2
Brakes

My opinion ...

The down side to the Lincoln caliper is that the cylinder bore is larger than the Mustang. Which means that the stock Mustang master cylinder is not designed to push enough fluid and might cause a mushy pedal. I believe Kevin has the Jeep master cylinder, but he also has disks on the rear.

If you want to keep the setup simple, stick with the Mustang calipers. They will work fine and the master cylinder is designed for them.

You can get new rotors at any parts store. A place like AutoZone will probably be the cheapest
 

kellerscobra

Contributing Member
Member
#4
I'm trying to block that from my memory, but as I remember they did do their job quite well; eventhough, I probably looked like this - 8O


BTW ... There was a guy, who lives in Warrenton, at Harvey's on Saturday, who says that there is a blue and white Cobra that drives past his house all the time going about 100mph. He says he can here it coming down the road and he loves to see fly by.
 

Ripper

CACC President Kevin Moses
Contributing Member
#6
Scott,

There was an story done on this brake setup in the December 2000 issue of Muscle mustang & Fast Fords. They recomended the company in Pasadena, MD called Stillen brake pros. (410) 360-6187. The sold me the s/s brake piston to replace the ceramic one. I did use braded brake lines.

Rip
 

Scott Harrison

"Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional"
Staff member
Contributing Member
Member
#7
Scott B & Greg,
I think bigger front brake calipers without a corresponding larger master cylinder would increase the pedal effort required rather than making them "mushy". If you have power assist, it wouldn't be a big deal.
More importantly, if you retain the OE rear brakes or even rear disks with smaller cylinders, you would probably need to adjust the proportioning valve. Since the FFR is 700-900 lbs lighter than the Mustang, the OE brakes should be large enough for the street; But, since the weight bias is close to 50%-50% vs the Mustang at 66%-34%, I believe the rear brakes will be doing alot more work.
However, if you're planning on doing any track events, I would highly recommend larger calipers/rotors in the front and disks in the rear. I can tell you, experiencing brake fade at 125 mph is an awful feeling. :cry:
Of course, there are people who will disagree with this. 8O See http://www.ffcobra.com/faq/brakes.html This guy used stock calipers/drums, no proportioning valve, but put on race pads, and SS brake lines with DOT4 fluid. My guess is, he's changing his rotors alot instead of his pads. "To each his own" :wink:
 

kellerscobra

Contributing Member
Member
#8
Scott H. - I agree that you would need to push harder to get it to brake. Basically what I was trying to get accross is to keep the brake setup simple. I do not think that Scott B. plans on any serious track time, so the stock setup should work well and keep the cost down a little ..... meanwhile.... this is coming from someone who put on power brakes ... :)
 
#10
Keeping the MC the same and increasing piston size will require more fluid volume to move in order to extend the piston a given amount. More fluid volume = longer stroke on the MC. You're braking effort will be EASIER since you'll have greater mechanical advantage over the calipers, but the pedal will feel mushy because of the increased stroke required.
 

Scott Harrison

"Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional"
Staff member
Contributing Member
Member
#11
This is why Wade is an engineer, and I'm not. Obviously, I have reversed Pascal's Law. :oops:
 

sbrookeinmd

Staff member
Contributing Member
#12
I might autocross a little but it would be more for fun than looking to crush the competition. My donor calipers are in pretty cruddy shape so I was considering getting new ones. I am getting new disks and keeping the drums. Kevin mentioned that his calipers were $16 each I think. The OE calipers I've seen have been in the $30 range but I haven't looked real hard yet. Considering the other issues that you guys have mentioned, I'm obviously leaning more towards the OE calipers now. I am trying to save money on a lot of this but I've changed my mindset on brakes. I keep thinking "low-cost" when I should be thinking "good or better" when it comes to brakes. So, where can I get OE calipers at a reasonable price? Anyone know the spec on the stainless lines? Are they just a standard OE replacement part? Thanks for all the info on this very important topic!
 

kellerscobra

Contributing Member
Member
#13
When you say stainless lines, I am assuming that you mean the braided lines which replace the stock rubber lines ...

The braided lines are a direct replacement for the stock rubber lines; however, if I were to do it again I would use the rubber rear line. I did not really car for the way the rear braided line fit and I think it would have been easier with the stock rubber line.
 
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